PUBLICATIONS

2017   Boys to Men. Chapter 3,  Policing the Black Man 

May 2017   Opinion: How Policing Black Boys Leads to the Conditioning of Black Menwww.npr.org

Summer  2017   Race, Paternalism, and the Right to Counsel.  American Criminal Law Review, Vol 54, #3

Spring 2015   Status, Race, and the Rule of Law in the Grand Jury.  Howard Law Journal, Vol 58, #3

Jan 2023   Criminalizing Normal Adolescent Behavior in Communities of Color: The Role of Prosecutors in Juvenile Justice Reform.  Cornell Law Review, Vol 98, #2.

2012   Juvenile Justice After Graham v Florida: Keeping Due Process, Autonomy, and Paternalism in Balance. Washington University Journal of Law & Policy, Vol 38.

October 2011   The Fourth Amendment Rights of Children at Home: When Parental Authority Goes Too Far. William and Mary Law Review, Vol 53, #1.

Spring 2006   It Takes a Lawyer to Raise a Child?: Allocating Responsibilities Among Parents, Children, and Lawyers in Delinquency Cases. Nevada Law Journal, Vol 6, #3

November 2005   Loyalty, Paternalism, and Rights: Client Counseling Theory and the Role of Child's Counsel in Delinquency Cases. Notre Dame Law Review, Vol 81, #1

2007   Defining the Lawyer-Self: Using Therapeutic Jurisprudence to Define the Lawyer's Role and Build Alliances that Aid the Child Client. The Affective Assistance of Counsel: Practicing Law as a Healing Profession, Chapter 14

May 2004   Eroding Confidentiality in Delinquency Proceedings: Should Schools and Public Housing Authorities Be Notified? New York University Law Review, Vol 79, #2

Journal Publications
Policing%20the%20Blackman%20cover_edited

with Jennifer Woolard, Racial Minority Youths’ Perceptions of the Justice System: Life on the Street, in
CHILDREN AND RACE: PSYCHOLOGY, LAW, AND PUBLIC POLICY

(ed. Margaret Stevenson, Bette L. Bottoms, Kelly C.
Burke) ( Oxford University Press 2020)

RIGHTS, RACE AND REFORM: 50 YEARS OF CHILD ADVOCACY IN THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM (eds., Kristin Henning, Laura Cohen, & Ellen Marrus) (Routledge Press, 2018)

Boys to Men: Policing and the Legal Socialization of Black Boys, in POLICING THE BLACK MAN

(ed. Angela Davis)(Random House 2017)

Deserve Ain’t Got Nothing to Do With It: Deconstructing Moral Justifications for Punishment Through the Wire, in
PUNISHMENT IN POPULAR CULTURE

(eds., Austin Sarat and Charles Ogletree)

(NYU Press 2015)

Combating Decision Fatigue in Supervision, in TRANSFORMING THE EDUCATION OF LAWYERS: THE THEORY AND PRACTICE
OF CLINICAL PEDAGOGY,

(eds. Sue Bryant, Elliot S. Millstein, Ann C. Shalleck)

(Carolina Academic Press 2014)

Books & Book Chapters

“Our nation's obsession with policing and incarcerating Black America begins with Black children.”

- Kristin N. Henning -

with Rebba Omer, Vulnerable and Valuable: Protecting Youth from the Perils of Custodial Interrogation, 51 Ariz. St. L. Rev. 505 (2021), Symposium Issue

The Reasonable Black Child: Race, Adolescence, and the Fourth Amendment, 67 Am. U. L. REV. 1513 (2018)


The Challenge of Race and Crime in a Free Society: The Racial Divide in 50 Years of Juvenile Justice Reform,
86 GEO. WASH. L. REV. 1604 (2018)


Race, Paternalism and the Right to Counsel, 54 AMER. CRIM. L. REV. 649 (2017)


Race, Status and the Rule of Law in the Grand Jury, 58 HOW. L.J. 833-843 (2015), Ferguson Symposium Issue


Teaching Fiction?: The Wire as a Pedagogical Tool in the Examination of Punishment Theory,

64 J. LEGAL EDUC. 120 (2014)


Criminalizing Normal Adolescent Behavior in Communities of Color: The Prosecutor’s Role in Juvenile Justice
Reform, 98
CORNELL L. REV. 383 (January 2013)


Juvenile Justice After Graham v. Florida: Keeping Due Process, Autonomy, and Paternalism in Balance, 12th Annual
Access to Equal Justice Colloquium, 38 WASH. U. J. OF LAW & POL’Y (2012)


When Parental Authority Goes Too Far: The Fourth Amendment Rights of Minors in the Parents’ Home, 53 WILLIAM
AND MARY L. REV. 55 (2011)


Denial of the Child's Right to Counsel, Voice, and Participation in Juvenile Delinquency Proceedings, 89 CHILD
WELFARE 121-138 (2010)


Loyalty, Paternalism and Rights: Client Counseling Theory and the Role of Child’s Counsel in Delinquency Cases,
81 NOTRE DAME L. REV. 245 (Nov 2005), cited by United States Supreme Court in Graham v. Florida, 130 S.Ct.
2011 (2010)


What’s Wrong With Victims’ Rights in Juvenile Court: Retributive v. Rehabilitative Systems of Justice,

97 CAL. L. REV.101 (August 2009)

Defining the Lawyer-Self: Using Therapeutic Jurisprudence to Define the Lawyer’s Role and Build Alliances that
Aid the Child Client,
in THE AFFECTIVE ASSISTANCE OF COUNSEL: PRACTICING LAW AS A HEALING PROFESSION (Carolina Academic Press, January 2007)


Eroding Confidentiality in Delinquency Proceedings: Should Schools and Public Housing Authorities be Notified?,
79 NYU L. REV. 520 (May 2004)


It Takes A Lawyer to Raise A Child?: Allocating Responsibilities Among Parents, Lawyers and Children in the
Juvenile Justice System, Conference on Representing Children in Families
: Exploring the Relationship Between
Children’s Advocacy and Justice Ten Years After Fordham, 6 NEVADA L. J. 836 (Spring 2006)

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THE RAGE of INNOCENCE

HOW AMERICA CRIMINALIZES BLACK YOUTH 

 

This critically acclaimed first full release by Kris Henning takes an in depth and honest look at America's transgressions against Black children that has lasting impacts on their lives and our society. She challenges the man, the system, and also uses her years of experience as a juvenile justice defender, an activist, a philanthropist, and a law professor to provide hard-hitting and impactful solutions that can help repair years of transgressions.  

 

A brilliant analysis of the foundation of racist policing in America: the day-to-day brutalities, largely hidden from public view, endured by Black youth growing up under constant surveillance and persistent threat of physical and psychological abuse by police.

Drawing upon twenty-five years of experience representing Black youth in Washington, D.C.'s juvenile court, Kristin Henning confronts America's irrational, manufactured fears of Black youth and makes a powerfully compelling case that the crisis in racist American policing begins with its relationship to Black children. She explains how discriminatory and aggressive policing has socialized a generation of Black teenagers to fear, resent, and resist the police, and details the long-term consequences of racism and trauma Black youth experience at the hands of police and their vigilante surrogates. She makes clear that unlike white youth, who are afforded the freedom to test boundaries, experiment with sex and drugs, and figure out who they are and who they want to be, Black youth are seen as a threat to white America and are denied healthy adolescent development. She examines the criminalization of Black adolescent play and sexuality, and of Black fashion, hair, and music. She limns the effects of police presence in schools, and the depth of policing-induced trauma in Black adolescents. Especially in the wake of the recent unprecedented, worldwide outrage at racial injustice and inequality, The Rage of Innocence: How America Criminalizes Black Youth is an essential book for our moment.

(Random House, 2021)

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Prosecuting Race and Adolescence, in THE OXFORD HANDBOOK OF PROSECUTORS AND PROSECUTION,

(eds. Ronald F. Wright, Kay L. Levine, Russel M. Gold)

(Oxford University Press 2021)